What To Expect From Your DUI Attorney

States mandate strict driving under the influence laws. If drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, you're committing a traffic violation. This violation can lead to other criminal charges. If you're facing a DUI charge, you'll need an attorney experienced with DUI and other traffic citations. Initial Meeting With Your Lawyer Prepare for your consultation with your attorney by gathering documentation related to your case. This includes police reports, the results of tests you took and witness statements. [Read More]

Know Your Rights: DWI

It's safe to say that you know it is dangerous to drive while intoxicated; however, you should also know your rights when you are pulled over because the law does not always work in your favor. Here is a list of do's and don'ts when a cop pulls a traffic stop on you in your vehicle. 1. Pulling Over Ensure that you use your turn signal when pulling over, and make sure you choose a busy section of the highway. [Read More]

Suing Someone For A Personal Injury When You've Been Previously Hurt

Can you sue someone for a personal injury if you've already had a previous injury to that part of your body? The simple answer: yes, you can sue. Your attorney will have to deal with some special issues as your case proceeds, but having a preexisting injury does not prevent you from seeking damages due to a new personal injury. What Issues Will My Attorney Need To Address? Essentially, what will happen is that the defendant's attorney will try to use your previous injury or disability to his or her advantage during the case. [Read More]

How To Petition For A Family Member To Immigrate To The United States.

Although most of the procedures for petitioning for family members to immigrate to the US are the same, some family relationships may require additional documentation. The time it will take for the immigration process to be completed will also vary greatly, depending on your relationship with the family member. US citizens can sponsor more family members than permanent residents (green card holders). While permanent residents can only petition for spouses, children under twenty one, and unmarried sons and daughters of any age, US citizens can also petition for married children, parents, and siblings. [Read More]